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Charles Krauthammer, Prominent Conservative Voice, Has Died

New York (AP) — Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from "Great Society" Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, died Thursday. He was 68. His death was announced by two organizations that were longtime employers, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post. Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks…

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Researchers Argue Proposed EPA Changes Could Cause 80,000 More Deaths a Decade

Two Harvard social scientists, writing an opinion column in a prominent medical journal, have put forward “an extremely conservative estimate” that some 80,000 more Americans could die each decade if proposed changes at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are implemented. The JAMA Forum” feature of the , which allows researchers to offer individual perspectives on health and policy. The EPA dismissed the essay as rhetoric, not research, in a statement provided to Bloomberg News. “This is not a scientific article, it’s a political article. The science is clear, under President Trump greenhouse gas emissions are down, water infrastructure…

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LA Is Doing Water Better Than Your City. Yes, That LA

wired East Porterville's situation is extreme, but it is not an outlier. If anything, it is a harbinger. "It was only an outlier in the concentration and sheer number of people who lived in a very small area that were affected by this," Jensen says. "There's approximately 300 communities in the state of California and more than a million residents who don't have reliable access to safe drinking water, and that's not even counting people who are on domestic wells." At the Edward C. Little Water Recycling Facility, engineers turn…

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Trump and Kim Can Learn a Thing or Two From Singapore

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are spending such a short amount of time in Singapore this week. Maybe they should stick around longer to see what makes its economy tick. Singapore is an especially wealthy nation, with a per capita income of bonuses attached that can double that sum for excellent performance. Is Peace With Kim Jong Un Even Possible? Yet it’s not just about the money. Since independence in 1965, Singaporean leaders have cultivated an ethos of public service in the bureaucracy. The…

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When Overtaxed Working Memory Knocks Your Brain Out of Sync

In 1956, the renowned cognitive psychologist George Miller published one of the field’s most widely cited papers, “The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two.” In it, he argued that although the brain can store a whole lifetime of knowledge in its trillions of connections, the number of items that humans can actively hold in their conscious awareness at once is limited, on average, to seven. Earl Miller, a neuroscientist at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, studies the interplay of brain waves…

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This Stock’s 9,500% Rally Created a Town of Millionaires

At most big companies, it’s pretty clear who the millionaires are: top executives, rainmakers, science whizzes with PhDs. But at China’s Bloomberg. The previously unreported value of their holdings has ballooned as Sunny Optical’s shares surged more than 9,500 percent since June 2008, trouncing even Netflix Inc.’s 7,500 percent gain. Founded more than three decades ago by a former appliance-factory worker with a high school education and less than $10,000 of borrowed cash, Sunny Optical is now a $22 billion behemoth that supplies lenses to the likes of Samsung and…

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Nasa Mars rover finds organic matter in ancient lake bed

Curiosity digs up carbon compounds that could be food for life in sediments that formed 3bn years ago Nasas veteranwhiffs of chlorine-containing organics in the planets rocks, but concerns over potential contamination and instrument glitches meant that the results did not convince everyone. The latest findings, separate paper published in Science, another Nasa-led team describes Curiositys latest measurements of the Martian atmosphere. Before the rover touched down in August 2012, missions to the red planet had already spotted methane in the atmosphere which spiked from time to time as plumes…

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Lessons from Montecito: Science’s Credibility Is At Stake

For applied scientists—that intrepid cadre who get their hands dirty in the sometimes dangerous world beyond the ivory tower, participating in difficult decisions with little time and major consequences—getting the right answer is only half the battle. The other half is successfully explaining what they’ve found, and what it means. This winter’s debris flows in the posh community of Montecito, California, which led to more than 20 deaths, provided examples of success and failure on both counts. And those successes and failures have ramifications far beyond managing geophysical risks. WIRED…

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Something’s Off With the Turbolaser Shots in The Last Jedi

I have a problem: I can't stop analyzing Star Wars movies. On top of that, there is another issue. I've stated that the physics of a movie doesn't have to be absolutely correct—and I still believe that. And now, I am going to complain about some physics in Star Wars: The Last Jedi even though I said you shouldn't. But first, let me give you a couple of examples of bad physics that doesn't bother me. Consider an x-wing fighter flying near the Death Star. When the x-wing makes a…

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Troubled Times for Alternatives to Einsteins Theory of Gravity

Miguel Zumalacárregui knows what it feels like when theories die. In September 2017, he was at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Saclay, near Paris, to speak at a meeting about dark energy and modified gravity. The official news had not yet broken about an epochal astronomical measurement—the detection, by gravitational wave detectors as well as many other telescopes, of a collision between two neutron stars—but a controversial tweet had lit a firestorm of rumor in the astronomical community, and excited researchers were discussing the discovery in hushed tones. A…

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Figure Out Where You Are With Nothing But a Watch and Protractor

In a recent episode of MacGyver, Angus (yes, that's his first name) finds his location in the desert using only a string, a protractor, and a watch. Is this actually possible? Basically, yes. (At least that's what I told the show-runners as the technical consultant for the show.) But you can do this, too. So now, for your super basic introduction to navigating the world. And don't worry—this won't be a full blown semester course on navigation, it's just the basics. Longitude If you want to find out where you…

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This Trucking Company Keeps Spacecraft Safe on the Interstate

When I ask Bradley Worthington to tell me about that one time people in the southwest thought his trucking company, McCollister's, was moving a UFO across the country, he laughs. There’s not a “that one time.” “It happens frequently,” he says, “especially with oversized things.” And McCollister's hauls a lot of oversized things. From astronaut capsules to weather-monitoring satellites to military aircraft, the company specializes in moving beefy, sensitive objects around securely. They've transported part of Orion, NASA's next astronaut-carrying spacecraft, and the recently-launched Joint Polar Satellite System-1, an environmental-monitoring…

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An Anti-Aging Pundit Solves a Decades-Old Math Problem

In 1950 Edward Nelson, then a student at the University of Chicago, asked the kind of deceptively simple question that can give mathematicians fits for decades. Imagine, he said, a graph—a collection of points connected by lines. Ensure that all of the lines are exactly the same length, and that everything lies on the plane. Now color all the points, ensuring that no two connected points have the same color. Nelson asked: What is the smallest number of colors that you’d need to color any such graph, even one formed…

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Life on Mars? Scientists close to solving mystery of the red planet

Mission to find source of methane detected in atmosphere may have an answer in months, researchers believe Scientists have begun an experiment aimed at solving one of astronomys most intriguing puzzles: the great Martian methane mystery. In the next few months they hope to determine whether tantalising whiffs of the gas that have been detected on the red planet in recent years are geological in origin or are produced by living organisms. On Earth, methane is produced mostly by microbes, although the gas can also be generated by relatively simple…

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