Headlines 

Hong Kong protests: government vows to push ahead with extradition bill

Leader Carrie Lam refuses to withdraw law, which critics fear could be abused by Beijing The leader of Hong Kongs government has said she remains determined to pass a proposed extradition law despite China. Opponents of the law say it is being pushed by the Chinese government, and fear that Beijing will use it to extradite activists, dissidents and other political opponents who will end up in Chinas opaque and politicised courts. Striking a defiant tone on Monday, Hong Kongs chief executive, Carrie Lam, said: This bill is not initiated…

Read More
Headlines 

US accuses China of using ‘concentration camps’ against Muslim minority

In a highly charged attack, the Pentagon says up to 3m people could be imprisoned in detention centres The United States has accused China on Friday of imprisoning more than a million Muslims in concentration camps in some of Washingtons strongest condemnation of Beijings treatment of minorities. The comments by Randall Schriver, who leads Asia policy at the US defense department, are likely to increase tension with Beijing, which is sensitive to international criticism and describes the sites as vocational education training centres aimed at stemming the threat of Islamic…

Read More
Odds and Ends 

Africa Roundup: Kenyas BRCK acquires EveryLayer, Nigerias TeamApt eyes global expansion

Kenyan communications hardware company BRCK acquired the assets of Nairobi-based internet provider Surf and its U.S. parent EveryLayer in a purchase deal of an undisclosed amount in February. Based in Nairobi, Surf is a hotspot service provider aimed at offering affordable internet to lower-income segments. BRCK is a five-year-old venture that pairs its rugged Wi-Fi routers to internet service packages designed to bring people online in frontier and emerging markets. With the acquisition, BRCK gains the assets of San Francisco-based EveryLayer and its Surf subsidiary, including 1,200 hotspots and 200,000 active customers…

Read More
Headlines 

Huawei’s Problem Isn’t Chinese Backdoors. It’s Buggy Software

A report on Thursday from a British government oversight group found that Chinese telecom-equipment maker Huawei has basic but deeply problematic flaws in its product code that create security risks. The shortcomings, many of which Huawei had previously promised to improve, stem from issues with its software development processes, according to the report. The findings come amid a concerted Trump administration effort to ban Huawei products around the world (particularly in 5G wireless networks), because of concerns that Huawei devices are controlled by the Chinese government or that Huawei would…

Read More
Headlines 

The Huawei Case Signals the New USChina Cold War Over Tech

The deepening saga of the US government’s campaign against Chinese tech company Huawei intensified this week, with Huawei filing a lawsuit in Texas alleging that the government’s ban of Huawei equipment is “illegal” and based on propaganda, not facts. The case may not have much of a chance legally, but it underscores how this contest has become a microcosm of the larger competition between the US and China over who will define—and control—the technology of the 21st century. The main thrust of the US push versus Huawei is that the…

Read More
Odds and Ends 

Transportation Weekly: Didi woes, how Nuro met Softbank, Amazons appetite

Welcome back to Transportation Weekly; I’m your host Kirsten Korosec, senior transportation reporter at TechCrunch. This is the second edition and seriously people, what happened this week? Too much. Too much! Never heard of TechCrunch’s Transportation Weekly? Catch up here. As I’ve written before, consider this a soft launch. Follow me on Twitter @kirstenkorosec to ensure you see it each week. (An email subscription is coming). Off we go … vroom. ONM … There are OEMs in the automotive world. And here, (wait for it) there are ONMs — original news manufacturers. (Cymbal…

Read More
Odds and Ends 

LinkedIn now requires phone number verification for all users in China

LinkedIn’s China site looks and functions just like LinkedIn everywhere else, except now it asks users in the country to verify their identities through phone numbers. The American company is requiring both new and existing users with a Chinese IP address to link mobile phone numbers to their accounts, TechCrunch noticed this week. LinkedIn had for months told its China-based users to provide mobile number details before sending them to the main page, but it had mercifully kept a little “Skip” button that let users avoid the fuss — until at least…

Read More
Headlines 

Urban Density: My Photo Series That Shows The True Side Of Living In Hong Kong

In these ‘Urban Density’ series, I explore the urban landscape of Hong Kong And Macau. Like Hong Kong, Macau is a special administrative region of the People’s Republic of China, and crowded apartments similar to Hong Kong can be found. #1 reply #2 reply View More Replies… #3 reply View More Replies… #4 reply View More Replies… #5 reply #6 reply View More Replies… #7 reply View More Replies… #8 reply reply View More Replies… #11 reply View More Replies… #12 reply View More Replies… #13 reply View More Replies……

Read More
Headlines 

China’s ‘Jack the Ripper’ executed for rapes, murders

(CNN)A serial killer who raped and murdered 10 women and one girl in northwest China has been executed, state media reported. His uncle’s DNA was taken over a minor offense — and turned out to be close enough to the killer’s that police suspected he must be related. Detectives narrowed in on Gao, covertly gathering his DNA to confirm he was the reclusive “Ripper.” Goa ultimately confessed to 11 murders in Gansu province and Inner Mongolia, and was sentenced to death in March last year. Most of the attacks took…

Read More
Headlines 

5 things to know for December 17: White House, Brexit, Sri Lanka, China, Hungary

(CNN) 1. White House It’s bound to be another exhausting week in Washington. Why? Let us count the ways: Over the weekend, President Trump lashed out at the ongoing Mueller investigation, calling it a “scam” and characterizing a raid of his former attorney Michael Cohen’s office as a break-in. This of course comes among court filings and sentencing hearings regarding some of the high-level Trump associates implicated in the investigations. Next up? Tuesday’s sentencing hearing for former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who admitted lying to the FBI. Moving on,…

Read More
Odds and Ends 

In venture capital, its still the age of the unicorn

Howie Xu At the time, the piece defined a new breed of startup — the $1 billion privately held company. When Lee did her first count, there were 39 “unicorns”; an improbable, but not impossible number.. Today, the once-scarce unicorn has become a global herd with 376 companies on the roster and counting. But the proliferation of unicorns begs raises certain questions. Is this new breed of unicorn artificially created? Could these magical companies see their valuations slip and fall out of the herd? Does this indicate an irrational exuberance…

Read More
Odds and Ends 

The SaaS VC gap: China & other markets trail the US

Jason Rowley As of mid-October (when we pulled the data for the above chart), Chinese companies accounted for about 39.3 percent of venture funding raised in 2018. Compare that to 38.4 percent for U.S.-based companies, overall. In this respect, the venture markets in the U.S. and China are running neck-and-neck.

Read More
Headlines 

‘You tell me’: China ambassador stumped on who aids Trump on trade

Cui Tiankai says other diplomats in DC face same problem while economic adviser Kudlow says China talks unsatisfactory Chinas ambassador to the US said on Sunday he and other diplomats in Washington did not know which advisers Donald Trump turns to when forming policy on trade. Cui Tiankai was asked on Peter Navarro, is a tariffs hardliner and ultra-loyalist who seems to have the presidents ear. Speaking a column published by Fox this week, Navarro linked policies meant to protect US businesses to the emergence of China as a major…

Read More
Headlines 

China Built the Worlds Largest Telescope. Then Came the Tourists

Credit Intentionally Withheld The day before, Stierwalt had traveled from Southern California to Pingtang Astronomy Town for a conference hosted by scientists from the world’s largest telescope. It was a new designation: China’s Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, or FAST, had been completed just a year before, in September 2016. Wandering, tipsy, around this shrine to the stars, the 40 or so other foreign astronomers had come to China to collaborate on the superlative-snatching instrument. VCG/Getty Images China spent $180 million to create the telescope, which officials have repeatedly said…

Read More