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NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine is coming to TC Sessions: Space 2020

This year marks our first-ever TC Sessions: Space event, and what better way to kick things off than with the head of NASA: Administrator Jim Bridenstine will join us onstage on June 25 in LA. NASA has been more open than ever before to working with startups and entrepreneurs, and we’ll hear directly from the administrator why that’s the case, and what kind of opportunities might be open to founders in the future. Administrator Bridenstine took over leading the U.S. science and space agency in 2018, and has been leading…

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Christina Koch returns to Earth after record-breaking space mission

Koch lands in Kazakhstan after 328 days in space, the longest continuous spaceflight by a female astronaut She would miss the friendship of her crewmates, she said, and of course the views. But after 328 days on the could not deny last week that she was looking forward to experiencing some very simple pleasures back on Earth, including the feeling of wind on my face. On Thursday the US astronaut was at last granted that wish, when the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, carrying Koch, Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov and Italys Luca…

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Boeings Starliner capsule lands safely in New Mexico after failed mission

Aborted flight threatens to derail the companys efforts to launch astronauts on behalf of Nasa next year landed its crew capsule in the New Mexico desert Sunday after an aborted flight to the international space station that threatened to derail the companys effort to launch astronauts on behalf of Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/dec/22/nasa-boeing-starliner-capsule-lands-safely-new-mexico

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The Death of a Star: Tycho Supernova

Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/RIKEN & GSFC/T. Sato et al; Optical: DSS In 1572, Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was among those who noticed a new bright object in the constellation Cassiopeia. Adding fuel to the intellectual fire that Copernicus started, Tycho showed this “new star†was far beyond the Moon, and that it was possible for the universe beyond the Sun and planets to change. Astronomers now know that Tycho’s new star was not new at all. Rather it signaled the death of a star in a supernova, an explosion so…

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27 Photos That Will Make You Understand Earths Place In The Universe

We are so entrenched in the bubbles of our social lives that sometimes we forget how insignificant some of the things are when put against the whole image. And while for some people this realization might be comforting, that a spilled coffee, a lost job or a loss of a relationship is just such a small fraction of things happening in the universe, for others the thought can be absolutely terrifying. Why not take a closer look at what’s out there and compare how vast the surrounding universe is compared…

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NASA Wishes Happy Halloween With Cosmic Pumpkin Photo of the Sun

Credit: NASA/GSFC/SDO NASA recently wished a Happy Halloween to their fans on Instagram and Facebook with a photo of the sun looking like a cosmic jack-o’-lantern. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this ultraviolet image in October 2014, showing active regions on our home star. The active regions in this image appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy. They are markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. ⣠You can find more images as well as…

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A Solar Eclipse on Jupiter

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill A recent series of images released by NASA on September 12th, 2019, captured a solar eclipse on Jupiter as its moon, Io, casts a shadow on the colossal planet’s north equatorial belt. The raw images were then processed by NASA software engineer and data wrangler, Kevin M. Gill, in the gallery you see here. For those curious as to why the moon’s shadow on Earth during an eclipse appears fuzzy while Io’s shadow is so sharp, astrophysicist Dr. Katherine Mack explains: Io is so big & close…

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The Aerosols of Earth

Image Credit: NASA/Joshua Stevens/Adam Voiland [NASA, Yvette Smith] Take a deep breath. Even if the air looks clear, it is nearly certain that you will inhale millions of solid particles and liquid droplets. These ubiquitous specks of matter are known as aerosols, and they can be found in the air over oceans, deserts, mountains, forests, ice and every ecosystem in between. If you have ever watched smoke billowing from a wildfire, ash erupting from a volcano or dust blowing in the wind, you have seen aerosols. Satellites like NASA’s Earth-observing…

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The Unsung 3rd Member of the Apollo 11 Crew Reflects on the 50th Anniversary

On July 21st, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to ever set foot on the moon. The third member of the historic Apollo 11 mission was Command Module Pilot, Michael Collins, whose mission was to bring everyone home. In this animated Google Doodle, Collins reflects on the 50th anniversary of the mission that changed our world forever. Read more: https://twistedsifter.com/videos/michael-collins-reflects-on-50th-anniversary-moon-landing/

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Glacial melting in Antarctica may become irreversible

Thwaites glacier is likely to thaw and trigger 50cm sea level rise, US study suggests A Nasa-funded study found instability in the Thwaites glacier meant there would probably come a point when it was impossible to stop it flowing into the sea and triggering a 50cm sea level rise. Other Antarctic glaciers were likely to be similarly unstable. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal found it was likely to succumb to instability linked to the retreat of its grounding line on the seabed that would lead to it…

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The Failure of NASA’s Spacewalk Snafu? How Predictable It Was

When Saralyn Mark heard the news earlier this month that NASA was planning the first all-women spacewalk at the International Space Station on March 29, she started to worry. Mark, an endocrinologist by training, was a senior medical advisor to NASA for 18 years. In that role, she studied the way men and women’s bodies differ, on space and on earth. Within the agency, she advocated for spacesuit and technological design that took these differences to account. She led two separate decadal reviews into how NASA handled sex and gender…

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RIP Mars Opportunity Rover. Designed For 90 Days, It Lasted 14 Years

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech One of the most successful and enduring feats of interplanetary exploration, NASA’s Opportunity rover mission is at an end after almost 15 years exploring the surface of Mars and helping lay the groundwork for NASA’s return to the Red Planet. The Opportunity rover stopped communicating with Earth when a severe Mars-wide dust storm blanketed its location in June 2018. After more than a thousand commands to restore contact, engineers in the Space Flight Operations Facility at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) made their last attempt to revive Opportunity…

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What the World Looks Like From the International Space Station

Compiled and edited (and color graded, denoised, deflickered, stabilized) by Bruce W. Berry Jr, all of 4K video and timelapse sequences were taken by the astronauts onboard the ISS (NASA/ESA). In the video description on Vimeo, Bruce adds: Some interesting facts about the ISS: The ISS maintains an orbit above the earth with an altitude of between 330 and 435 km (205 and 270 miles). The ISS completes 15.54 orbits per day around the earth and travels at a speed of 27,600 km/h; 17,100 mph).   The yellow line that…

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Mars Lander Captures Haunting Sound of Martian Winds

Listen to Martian wind blow across NASA’s InSight lander. The spacecraft’s seismometer and air pressure sensor picked up vibrations from 10-15 mph (16-24 kph) winds as they blew across Mars’ Elysium Planitia on Dec. 1, 2018. The seismometer readings are in the range of human hearing, but are nearly all bass and difficult to hear on laptop speakers and mobile devices. We provide the original audio and a version pitched up by two octaves to make them audible on mobile devices. Playback is suggested on a sound system with a…

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Travelled 300 Million Miles, Took This Pic

NASA/JPL-Caltech The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA’s InSight lander, took this picture of the Martian surface on Nov. 26, 2018, the same day the spacecraft touched down on the Red Planet. The camera’s transparent dust cover is still on in this image, to prevent particulates kicked up during landing from settling on the camera’s lens. This image was relayed from InSight to Earth via NASA’s Odyssey spacecraft, currently orbiting Mars. InSight, short for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, is a…

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