Odds and Ends 

Capella Space reveals new satellite design for real-time control of high-resolution Earth imaging

Satellite and Earth observation startup Capella Space has unveiled a new design for its satellite technology, which improves upon its existing testbed hardware platform to deliver high-resolution imaging capable of providing detail at less than 0.5 meters (1.6 feet). Its new satellite, code-named “Sequoia,” also will be able to provide real-time tasking, meaning Capella’s clients will be able to get imaging from these satellites of a desired area basically on demand. Capella’s satellites are “synthetic aperture radar” (SAR for short) imaging satellites, which means they’re able to provide 2D images…

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Odds and Ends 

The Death of a Star: Tycho Supernova

Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/RIKEN & GSFC/T. Sato et al; Optical: DSS In 1572, Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was among those who noticed a new bright object in the constellation Cassiopeia. Adding fuel to the intellectual fire that Copernicus started, Tycho showed this “new star†was far beyond the Moon, and that it was possible for the universe beyond the Sun and planets to change. Astronomers now know that Tycho’s new star was not new at all. Rather it signaled the death of a star in a supernova, an explosion so…

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Headlines 

27 Photos That Will Make You Understand Earths Place In The Universe

We are so entrenched in the bubbles of our social lives that sometimes we forget how insignificant some of the things are when put against the whole image. And while for some people this realization might be comforting, that a spilled coffee, a lost job or a loss of a relationship is just such a small fraction of things happening in the universe, for others the thought can be absolutely terrifying. Why not take a closer look at what’s out there and compare how vast the surrounding universe is compared…

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Odds and Ends 

Visualizing the Earths Rotation With a Timelapse of the Milky Way

In this intriguing timelapse by Aryeh Nirenberg, the Earth’s imperceptible rotation is visualized by keeping the Milky Way Galaxy centered for the timelapse’s duration. As Aryeh described on YouTube: A timelapse of the Milky Way that was recorded using an equatorial tracking mount over a period of around 3 hours to show Earth’s rotation relative to the Milky Way.   I used a Sony a7SII with the Canon 24-70mm f2.8 lens and recorded 1100 10″ exposures at a 12-second interval. All the frames were captured at F/2.8 and 16000iso. Read…

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