Headlines 

The PGA just got hit with ransomware

This club was built for mining.Image: Sam Greenwood/getty Raise that single gloved-hand to your mouth in shock: The hackers have gone after golf. America’s last bastion of proud visor-wearers is scrambling this week, after unknown criminals took over the PGA of America’s servers on Tuesday — locking the golf association out of its files just days before the official Aug. 9 start of the PGA Championship in Missouri. And you better believe those hackers want bitcoin.  SEE ALSO: Ransomware has been around for almost 30 years, so why does it…

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Headlines 

How NATO Defends Against the Dark Side of the Web

"Oops, your files have been encrypted!" This was the chilling message that greeted hundreds of thousands of computer users last summer. The WannaCry ransomware attack brought production to a standstill at Renault factories across France, put lives at risk by attacking hospitals in the UK, and cost companies around the world billions of dollars in lost revenue. WIRED OPINION ABOUT Jens Stoltenberg (@jensstoltenberg) is NATO secretary general and the former prime minister of Norway. The digital revolution has transformed our lives for the better. But this revolution has a dark…

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Odds and Ends 

More than half of major malware attacks victims are industrial targets

A new report from cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Labs examining the targets and intended effects of this weeks massive malware attack comes up with some significant insights. The attack, initially believed to be a variation of commercial malware software known as Petya, appeared to be a vast ransomware scheme. As the story developed, it became clear that the attack was more destructive than it was lucrative, as ransom payments failed to result in a return of decryption keys that would unlock affected systems. Furthermore, at the time of writing, the attack…

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Odds and Ends 

Todays huge ransomware attack has only made about $7,500 so far

Ransomware attacks are bigger than ever, but the payouts appear to be shrinking. While the ransomware suspected to be a variant of Petyamakes headlines around the world, whoever set it loose isnt really making a whole lot of money, especially if they paid for the software to begin with. At the time of writing, the Bitcoin address that todays global attack points to has only collected 29 payments, for a total of 3.15 BTC, or $7,497. Considering the breadth of entities affected, that suggests that most victims know better than…

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Odds and Ends 

WannaCry ransomware is still spreading fast, but kill switch defenses hold for now

The WannaCry ransomware sweeping the world hasnt stopped its progress, but quick action by cybersecurity professionals has at least partially limited the damage it does as it goes. Over the weekend a kill switch was check out the original post on this behavior). Of course they immediately registered it, preventing the new, mutant malware from activating. A side benefit of doing so is that the researchers get a ping whenever the ransomware infects a new computer,

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Odds and Ends 

That global ransomware attack was halted apparently by accident

The whole story is here, but the gist is this. The ransomware, as you may have heard, The security researcher, on seeing that the ransomware called out to this unregistered domain, immediately registered it so they could monitor the traffic (they could producing the map above). They thought it would just help track its spreading, but in fact by registering that domain they effectively killed the whole attack. Because now when the code pinged that domain, it returned that it was registered, and therefore the ransomware would never activate itself!…

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