Odds and Ends 

WannaCry hero heads into Tuesday hearing as the security community crowdfunds his defense

Over the weekend, the security community raised legal funds for Marcus Hutchins, the researcher famed for stopping the spread of the malware known as WannaCry. Hutchins, also known as MalwareTech, was arrested by the FBI last week for his alleged role in disseminating Kronos, a banking trojan that first wrought havoc in 2014. With a hearing set for Tuesday in Wisconsin, Hutchins many supporters have rallied to donate toward covering his legal costs. The fund was set up by Symantec Cybersecurity Czar Tarah Wheeler and the tech law firm of…

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More than half of major malware attacks victims are industrial targets

A new report from cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Labs examining the targets and intended effects of this weeks massive malware attack comes up with some significant insights. The attack, initially believed to be a variation of commercial malware software known as Petya, appeared to be a vast ransomware scheme. As the story developed, it became clear that the attack was more destructive than it was lucrative, as ransom payments failed to result in a return of decryption keys that would unlock affected systems. Furthermore, at the time of writing, the attack…

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Todays huge ransomware attack has only made about $7,500 so far

Ransomware attacks are bigger than ever, but the payouts appear to be shrinking. While the ransomware suspected to be a variant of Petyamakes headlines around the world, whoever set it loose isnt really making a whole lot of money, especially if they paid for the software to begin with. At the time of writing, the Bitcoin address that todays global attack points to has only collected 29 payments, for a total of 3.15 BTC, or $7,497. Considering the breadth of entities affected, that suggests that most victims know better than…

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WannaCry ransomware is still spreading fast, but kill switch defenses hold for now

The WannaCry ransomware sweeping the world hasnt stopped its progress, but quick action by cybersecurity professionals has at least partially limited the damage it does as it goes. Over the weekend a kill switch was check out the original post on this behavior). Of course they immediately registered it, preventing the new, mutant malware from activating. A side benefit of doing so is that the researchers get a ping whenever the ransomware infects a new computer,

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