Headlines 

Trade Wars Are Bad and Hard to Win, U.K. Tells Trump

The U.K. has “deep concern” about the U.S. plan to slap tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, and negotiated accords are better, Prime Minister Theresa May told President Donald Trump. The two leaders spoke Sunday by telephone, with May saying “multilateral action was the only way to resolve the problem of global overcapacity in all parties’ interests,” according to a spokesman for the prime minister. Trump’s vow that trade wars are good and are easy to win also drew a rebuke from one of May’s most senior ministers, who said…

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China Political Advisers Urge Response to U.S. Tariffs

Delegates from China’s top political advisory body, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, convened Saturday in Beijing. The representatives from a variety of political, social, economic and corporate organizations are meeting in parallel with a two-week session of the rubber-stamp parliament that begins Monday.  The legislature is expected to enact sweeping changes that would allow President Xi Jinping to rule indefinitely and give him greater control over the levers of money and power. The agenda includes repealing presidential term limits, creating a powerful new agency to police officials and possibly approving…

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Singapore’s Economy Grows Faster Than Estimated

Singapore’s economy finished 2017 on a solid footing, allowing more room for policy makers as they consider raising taxes and tightening monetary policy this year. Growth was higher taxes when the government releases its budget on Feb. 19, with one option being an increase in the goods and services tax. The Monetary Authority of Singapore may also shift to a tightening stance after government and the central bank forecast GDP growth of 1.5 to 3.5 percent this year. A stabilizing labor market and recharged property market is setting up a…

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How China Will Shake Up the Oil Futures Market

China, the world’s biggest oil buyer, is on the verge of opening a domestic market to trade futures contracts. It’s been planning one for years, only to encounter delays. The Shanghai International Energy Exchange, a unit of Shanghai Futures Exchange, will be known by the acronym INE and will allow Chinese buyers to lock in oil prices and pay in local currency. Also, foreign traders will be allowed to invest — a first for China’s commodities markets — because the exchange is registered in Shanghai’s free trade zone. There are…

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